MAFDET

Mafdet (also spelled Maftet) is depicted as a woman with the head of a cheetah. Her name means (she who) runs swiftly. She is present in the Egyptian pantheon as early as the First Dynasty.
Mafdet was the deification of legal justice, or rather, of execution. Thus she was also associated with the protection of the king's chambers and other sacred places, and with protection against venomous animals, which were seen as transgressors against Ma'at.
Since venomous animals such as scorpions and snakes are killed by felines, Mafdet was seen as a feline goddess, although it is uncertain whether alternately, she also was meant to be a cat, a mongoose, or a leopard. In reflection of the manner in which these animals kill snakes and she was given titles such as, slayer of serpents.

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Original author: Nubian
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ANPU

Anpu (Inpew, Yinepu,Anubis) was an ancient Egyptian god of the underworld who guided and protected the spirits of the dead. He was known as the 'Lord of the Hallowed Land' - the necropolis - and Khenty Amentiu, 'Foremost of the Westerners' - the Land of the Dead was thought to be to the west, where the Egyptians buried their dead. (Khenty Amentiu was the name of a previous canine deity who was superseded by Anpu.) The worship of Anpu was an ancient one - it was probably even older than the worship of Asar. In the pyramid texts of Unas, his role was already very clear - he was associated with the Eye of Horus and he was already thought to be the guide of the dead in the afterlife, showing them the way to Asar.

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Original author: Nubian
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MAAHES

Maahes (also spelled Mihos, Miysis, Mios, Maihes, and Mahes) was an ancient Egyptian lion-headed god of war, whose name means "he who is true beside her". He was seen as the son of the feline goddess (Bast in Lower Egypt or Sekhmet in Upper Egypt) whose nature he shared. Maahes was a deity associated with war and weather, as well as that of knives, lotuses, and devouring captives. He was believed to help Ra fight against Apep in the solar barque each night, a god who protected the pharaoh while he was in
battle.

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Original author: Nubian
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RENENUTET

Renenutet (Renenet, Ernutet, Termuthis), "She Who Rears", was a cobra goddess of nursing or rearing children, fertility and protector of the pharaoh. Known as the "Nourishing Snake", she not only was a goddess who was sometimes shown nursing a child, but she offered her protection to the pharaoh in the land of the dead. In later times she was thought to be the goddess who presided over the eighth month of the Egyptian calendar, known by Greek times as Parmutit. In the afterlife, Renenutet was seen as a fire-breathing cobra who was liked to Uatchet (Uatch-Ura, Wadjet). The was also seen by the Egyptians as the protector of the clothing worn by the pharaoh in the underworld, and thus thought to instill fear in his enemies. Because of this, she was also linked to mummy bandages, offering them to the dead. In Ptolemaic times, she was called "Lady of the Robes" due to her association with clothing.

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Original author: Nubian
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SUTEKH

Sutekh (Seth, Setekh, Sut, Set, Sety) was one of the most ancient of the Egyptian gods and the focus of worship since the Predynastic Period. As part of the Ennead of Heliopolis he was the son of Nut and Geb and the brother of Asaru, Horus the elder,Aset and Nephthys. He was a storm god associated with strange and frightening events such as eclipses, thunderstorms and earthquakes. He also represented the desert and, by extension, the foreign lands beyond the desert. His glyph appears in the Egyptian words for "turmoil", "confusion", "illness", "storm" and "rage". He was considered to be very strong but dangerous, and strange. However, he was not always considered to be an evil being. Sutekh was a friend of the dead, helping them to ascend to heaven on his ladder, and he protected the life giving oases of the desert, and was at times a powerful ally to the pharaoh and even the sun god Ra.

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Original author: Nubian
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RENPET

Renpet was the ancient Egyptian goddess who personified fertility, spring and youth. She was often known as the "Mistress of Eternity" and her name was used to express the term "year". She is depicted as a young woman wearing a palm shoot over her head. The palm shoot represented "time" and this glyph regularly appears on monuments and documents throughout Egyptian history as the beginning of the phrase recording the regnal year of the pharaoh. She was worshipped in Memphis and Crocodilopolis and was considered to be an aspect of Aset.

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Original author: Nubian
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UNUT

Originally, she had the form of a snake and was called "The swift one". She came from the fifteenth Upper Egyptian province and was worshipped with Tehuti at its capital Hermopolis. Later she was depicted with a woman's body and a hare's head. She was taken into the cult of Haru and later of Re. she appears rarely in literature and inscriptions. An exceptional sculpture of her has been found by American archaeologists. Her name was taken in to the highest royal position just once in the long Egyptian history. The only king bearing her name was Unas from dynasty five.

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Original author: Nubian
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WERETHEKAU

Weret-hekau was a lion headed goddess who was also depicted as a snake with the head of a woman. She was the wife of Re-Horakhty and wore his symbol (the sun disc) on her head along with a cobra on her brow. She protected the sun god and acted as a wet nurse for the pharaohs.

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Original author: Nubian
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WOSRET

Wosret - Wasret ("The powerful") was a guardian goddess from Thebes (Egyptian: Waset) in Upper Egypt. Possibly she was the earliest consort of Amun at Karnak, preceding Mut. Certainly Middle Kingdom pharaohs of Theban origins take her name as an element in their own, such as Sen-Wosret, meaning "man belonging to Wosret." She became popular during the twelfth dynasty when four kings called themselves - Senwosret meaning - "The man (i.e. son) of Wasret.Some tales say that she watched over precious metals, wealth, mines, and treasures.

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Original author: Nubian
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